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Knee Replacement

Article

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is a type of arthritis. It refers to joint pain or joint disease. Osteoarthritis affects tissue that covers the ends of bones in joints (cartilage). Cartilage acts as a cushion between the bones and helps them move smoothly. Osteoarthritis occurs when cartilage in the joints gets worn down. Osteoarthritis is sometimes called "wear and tear" arthritis.

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. It occurs most often in older people and is a condition that gets worse over time. The joints most often affected by this condition are in the fingers, toes, hips, knees, and spine, including the neck and lower back.

Article

Knee Replacement Surgery

Joint Replacement Surgery

Total knee replacement is a procedure to replace the damaged knee joint surface with an artificial (prosthetic) knee joint. The purpose of this surgery is to reduce knee pain and improve knee function. The prosthetic knee joint (prosthesis) may be made of metal, plastic, or ceramic. It replaces surfaces of the thigh bone (femur), lower leg bone (tibia), and kneecap (patella).

Doctors recommend joint replacement surgery when knee pain and loss of function become severe and when conservative treatments no longer relieve pain. Your doctor will use X-rays to look at the bones and cartilage and determine appropriate treatment.

Preparing for Knee Replacement Surgery

Your new knee will give you freedom to move in ways you haven’t for a long time. Getting the new knee to work well for you will involve more than just surgery. Our experience shows that two other factors will make a big difference:

  • First, choose a friend or family member as your "coach" to provide encouragement and support throughout the process. 
  • Second, you and your coach should learn what to expect by attending pre-surgery joint replacement education class. It’s best to attend 2-3 weeks prior to your surgery and if possible, before your final pre-operative appointment with your doctor in case you have additional questions.

Your Joint Replacement Surgery Team

Learn more about the surgeons, nurses, and therapists committed to ensuring the best possible outcome for your surgery.

Your Knee Replacement Surgery Team

It takes a village to make sure you’re well cared for throughout the entire knee replacement process. Learn more about the team that’s committed to providing you a safe, successful, and positive experience.

Recovery After Joint Replacement Surgery

Learn what to expect after hip or knee replacement surgery, as well as ways to support a safe recovery.

Recovery from Knee Replacement Surgery

Your knee replacement journey will continue after you’re discharged from the hospital. Learn more about how we’ll help prepare you and your coach for the most successful recovery possible.

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Find a surgeon in the St. Luke's joint replacement program