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Epilepsy and Driving

Epilepsy and Driving

Overview

If you have seizures that change your awareness, consciousness, or muscle control, you may not have the legal right to drive.

  • Laws vary from state to state. You may have to be seizure-free for at least 6 months to 1 year before you can get a driver's license.
  • The laws of the state you live in, not your doctor, decide whether you have the right to drive. You can find out about the law in your state by visiting the Epilepsy Foundation website.
  • Some drugs used to control epilepsy may make you drowsy. If you just started a new drug, don't drive until you know how the drug will affect you.

The laws about who can drive may seem unfair. But they can keep you and others safe until your seizures are under control.

Be sure to take antiepileptic medicine as prescribed. Taking it incorrectly makes it more likely you'll have an accident.

Related Information

Credits

Current as of: December 13, 2021

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
John Pope MD - Pediatrics
Adam Husney MD - Family Medicine
Martin J. Gabica MD - Family Medicine
Kathleen Romito MD - Family Medicine
Steven C. Schachter MD - Neurology

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