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Catheters for Urinary Incontinence in Men

Catheters for Urinary Incontinence in Men

Treatment Overview

Types of catheters include:

Straight catheter.

This is a thin, flexible, hollow tube that is inserted through the urethra into the bladder. It allows the urine to drain out. A straight catheter is used for intermittent self-catheterization.

Indwelling Foley catheter.

This type of catheter remains in place continuously. It has a balloon on the end that is inflated with sterile water after the end is inside the bladder. The inflated balloon prevents the indwelling catheter from slipping out.

Condom catheter or Texas catheter.

This is a special condom that fits over the penis and is attached to a tube that collects urine. With a condom catheter, you don't need to insert anything into your body. This catheter can be changed at home. But it can be hard to put on and needs to be checked often. And skin can get irritated from contact with urine.

What To Expect

Catheterization may cause some discomfort during the procedure. A condom or Texas catheter doesn't cause much discomfort. That's because it isn't inserted into the urethra. But indwelling catheters may cause some discomfort while in place.

Why It Is Done

Catheters can be used to treat severe incontinence that cannot be managed with medicines or surgery.

How Well It Works

Catheters don't cure incontinence. They allow you or a caregiver to manage incontinence. These devices work well. But some men find catheters uncomfortable or painful, so they stop using them.

Risks

Using a catheter increases your risk for:

Credits

Current as of: February 10, 2021

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
E. Gregory Thompson MD - Internal Medicine
Adam Husney MD - Family Medicine
Elizabeth T. Russo MD - Internal Medicine

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